The Corkers vs. The Screwtops–The Real Political Debate of 2016

Tired of hearing about Trump’s border campaign and Hillary’s scandals? How about shifting your focus to the great Cork Campaign and the Screwtop Scandals? Never heard of them? Well, that’s because I just made those up…sort of…

The names might be a mockery, but the concept behind them is actually a pretty real thing in wine culture! Should you stick with tradition and put a cork in it? Or should you just say “Screw it!” and screw it? Some wine-o’s will pick a side and stand firm, others like myself will stay neutral and acknowledge there are benefits and downfalls to each type of wine stopper.

 

The Corkers

Let’s start with the obvious reason to purchase corked wine–tradition! Historically, this is just how wine was preserved. As a wine-lover, there is something ceremonial about plunging a corkscrew into the spongy cork and hearing that ever-so-pleasing pop as you yank it from the bottleneck. Something about simply unscrewing a metal top is extremely anti-climactic.

Tradition aside, there is the benefit of ageing a wine in a corked bottle. The porous nature of a cork allows just the right amount of air into the bottle over time to give you that perfectly smooth textured wine once the time comes to drink it. Therefore, I would have to argue that corks are beneficial for wines that get better with age, like a Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay. As time goes on letting air slowly through the cork, your Cab will become softer and fruitier and your Chard will become smooth and buttery.

 

The Screwtops

The future of wine bottling is in the screw top. Again, we’ll start with one of the obvious reasons to choose screw tops–for the winemaker, it’s cheaper than buying corks and for the consumer, it’s convenient to open and re-close.

Another obvious reason for choosing screw tops is the problem of “cork taint”. Every now and then, albeit rarely, a cork will be affected by a contaminant. This contaminant can be mold or chemical-related during manufacturing. Imagine that lovely scene I described earlier when you open a bottle for your guests. Everyone is watching, eager for their first pour. Pop..Pour…Pewww!! What is that stench of dirty socks in a gym locker? Cork taint. The bottle is no good, and hopefully you’ve been a frugal grape and not spent over $20 on it because it’s going right down the drain 😦

Finally, for aged wines, studies have shown that a screw top should not affect the quality or ageing process of a wine, so do not automatically assume a wine is poor quality because it is screwed shut.

 

Where do I stand?

I have no judgments about the quality of a wine based on its top, but I am more of a “corker” in the sense that I love that ritualistic feeling of opening a bottle the traditional way. Plus, I love collecting corks!

For now, given the research and information I have read about, I will choose corked wines if they are aged and meant to have been exposed to air slowly over time, and all other wines I have decided it really doesn’t matter.

 

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Wine Storage: Delaying Your Bottle’s Imminent Death

Hypothetically speaking, let’s say you don’t finish that bottle of wine by the time your Friday night Netflix binge ends…(hypothetically, because we all know the truth). What do you do with it next? Maybe you stick the cork back in it and set it on the counter. Maybe you put it in the fridge, corked or not. Or maybe–GOD FORBID– you just dump that last 5oz down the drain. 

After a bottle is opened, the wine is exposed to oxygen. The longer a wine is exposed to oxygen, the more the intended flavors of the wine evolve into something else. With improper storage, those flavors and aromas can quickly become unappealing. Follow these easy steps to preserve your white AND red wines:

  • Put a Cork in It

Not the actual cork, but an airtight one, like these cute and colorful rubber ones!

stoppers

This will only preserve the wine for a day or two, but it lets in less air than stuffing the original cork back in. I recommend using these if you’re just setting the wine aside for a little while, or if you plan on finishing it the next day. 

The best way would be to get vacuum stoppers with a pump, and basically pump out as much air as you can. This preservation technique will give your wine 3-4 more days of life, and BONUS- is a great arm workout!

vacuum

  • Stand Tall

Although you may store your wine on its side before opening it, be sure to always stand it upright after opening it. The less liquid in the bottle, the more surface area oxygen can get into when it’s laying horizontally. Stand it vertically and the surface area decreases.

This is also why you shouldn’t just stuff the original cork back in. When a bottle is on its side, the cork stays moist and swollen. While the bottle is standing, no wine is wetting the cork. As a result, the cork dries and cracks and lets in air.

  • Stay Cool

Regardless of white wine or red wine, refrigeration is best after opening. The low temperature slows down the chemical changes happening to your wine. However, when you’re ready to drink your red wines again, warm them back up to room temperature naturally by leaving them on the counter for awhile or, to save time, run room temperature water from the sink over the bottle. 

 

 

Part of being frugal with your wine is getting the most out of it. Don’t have time to enjoy a bottle all at once? Preserve it properly and you can still get your money’s worth.